Lincoln Trio, piano trio Rescheduled Concert!

 LINCOLN TRIO CONCERT

PROGRAM

The Lincoln Trio
Desirée Ruhstrat, violin David Cunliffe, cello Marta Aznavoorian, piano

Piano Trio in G minor H.XV No.1                                                        Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
   Moderato
   Menuet
   Presto

"Après un rêve" Opus 7, No.1 (from "Trois mélodies)                         Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

Trio, Opus 11 “Gassenhauer”                                                              Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    Allegro con brio
   Adagio
   Tema con variazioni

Trio in C major, Opus 87                                                                      Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
    Allegro moderato

Nominated for a 2017 GRAMMY Award for Best Performance by a Small Ensemble, the Lincoln Trio has become Chicago’s most celebrated chamber ensemble. Praised for their "joy of sheer technical ability, unanimity of phrasing and beautiful blended tone" the trio takes its name from their home in the heartland of the USA. The Trio's polished presentations of well-known chamber works and their ability to forge new paths with contemporary repertoire has led to the group's reputation as a first rate ensemble, drawing an eclectic audience of sophisticated music lovers, young admirers of contemporary programs, and students discovering chamber music for the first time. They were the winners of the 2008 Masterplayers International Competition in Venice, Italy.

Each member is an artist of international renown. Violinist Desirée Ruhstrat has performed throughout the US and Europe, appearing at the White House and performing on a live radio broadcast heard around the world with the Berlin Radio Orchestra. Cellist David Cunliffe has performed with the BBC and Royal Scottish orchestras as well as touring as a member of the Balanescu Quartet, and pianist Marta Aznavoorian has appeared with the Chicago Symphony and has performed at the Kennedy Center and the Sydney Opera House.

We applaud Radiology Associates of Tallahassee for sponsoring this performance.

Radiology Associates

The Lincoln Trio appear by arrangement with Lisa Sapinkopf Artists

www.chambermuse.com

PROGRAM NOTES

HAYDN:

A quarter of a century or more before the great piano trios of the 1780s and 1790s, Haydn composed a dozen or so trios, dubbed “divertimento” or “partita,” that look back to the Baroque trio sonata. This G minor trio (one of the first two works that Haydn composed in a minor key) is especially striking, with its austere, richly ornamented first movement suggestive of the harpsichord. The second movement Minuetto immediately brings to mind Beethoven’s Opus 1 no.1 trio, despite Beethoven’s irascible claim that he “learned nothing” from Haydn. The elegance of the early French dance, the menuet, also marks this movement. The daring finale Presto is over in a flash, but not before we appreciate Haydn’s efforts at the age of 35—efforts that point directly to his later accomplishments.

FAURE:

Gabriel Fauré was a French composer, organist, pianist and teacher. He was one of the foremost French composers of his generation, and his musical style influenced many 20th-century composers.

Originally for solo voice and piano, “Après un rêve” describes a dream of romantic flight with a lover, away from the earth and “towards the light.” However, on waking to the truth, the dreamer longs to return to the “mysterious night” and the ecstatic falsehood of his dream.

Beethoven:

Beethoven wrote six major piano trios, beginning with the set of three he deemed worthy enough to be published as his Opus 1. Between these and the three masterpieces of his maturity, Beethoven wrote his charming piano trio, Opus 11, originally scored for clarinet, cello and piano but also published, with little modification, in a transcription for the typical piano trio. Both versions are popular today.

The Opus 11 trio is is often described by adjectives that one does not necessarily associate with Beethoven: gentle, lyrical, playful, even “light”. The trio takes its nickname, the “Gassenhauer Trio” (Popular Song Trio), from the use Beethoven made, in the last movement, of a theme taken from Joseph Weigl’s comic opera L’amor marinaro (Love among the Sailors).

The first performance of the Trio was at a house concert in the presence of Beethoven’s rival, the virtuoso pianist Daniel Steibelt. Since the piano part gave relatively little scope for display, Steibelt managed to outshine Beethoven in performing a quintet of his own. A week later Steibelt further provoked Beethoven by playing a brilliant set of variations on the Weigl melody of Beethoven’s last movement. Beethoven took his revenge by playing a virtuoso improvisation on a motif from Steibelt’s quintet, seizing a cello part, which he placed upside down on the music stand.

BRAHMS:

After his Opus 8 Piano Trio of 1954, Brahms did not approach the piano-trio medium again until 1880, when he started two at once. One we know about only from references in his letters; the other, in C major, was completed in 1882 and published as his Opus 87. During all the years since 1853, Brahms had continued his association with the Schumann family, becoming a good friend of Clara Schumann, whom he consulted on numerous artistic matters, sometimes sending her works in progress, or playing them through for her; he trusted her artistic judgment perhaps even more than his own, or at least, needed her opinion as a kind of supplement. When Clara Schumann, one of the greatest pianists and teachers of the 19th century, first heard the C major trio, she declared it was “a glorious work . . . playing it is a musical treat.”

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